Jade Guo’s Interview

Jade Guo’s Interview

Jade Guo’s Interview

Interview held on July 8, 2020

The following interview was conducted with one of our previous COGS 402 students, Jade. Her project focused on creating a collective mind-map of what the Cognitive Systems degree means to students, and what they have learned from their degree. Read on to learn more about her project, and the user experience work she was involved in after completing her project.

Q: What is your role with the Tapestry project?

A: It’s kind of hard to explain because I’m doing a lot of things. I think the first part of my job is assisting user research. The second part is closer to the project management aspect: figuring out what we need to do at each stage and developing a workflow that best supports each individual in the team.

Q: Tell us about your experience working on your COGS 402 project last term. Why did you choose to study your specific subject for your project?

A: My project is about using curriculum design to essentially unlock the question: “What is Cognitive Systems at UBC?”. The reason why I wanted to do this project is I am graduating and want to know how people in my program define the program, but at the same time provide a definition as a community to the world about who we are. The reason why I used Tapestry to do my project is that Tapestry allows me to conduct such experiment in a way that’s organic. A lot of people who participate in my study would not expect what they will come up with. It’s a step-by-step process that allows them to know more about themselves, and based on their answers, I created this whole “how do nineteen of us think what COGS actually is”.

A sample tapestry from Jade’s COGS 402 project: “Knowledge Themes” identified by COGS students.

Q: Specifically, what have you learned from your experience working as a COGS 402 student and from working on your project as well?

A: I think the first part is definitely being able to run my own study. It’s a lot of work and I think I was overly ambitious in the beginning. But it was very rewarding in a sense that after this study, I was able to really know that this is something I want to do moving forward and know more about why I’m interested in certain aspects of the project and why it’s important to do research along the lines with curriculum visualization. Also, I think learning analytics and how to analyze learning in general were very interesting for me.

A: I think the first part is definitely being able to run my own study. It’s a lot of work and I think I was overly ambitious in the beginning. But it was very rewarding in a sense that after this study, I was able to really know that this is something I want to do moving forward and know more about why I’m interested in certain aspects of the project and why it’s important to do research along the lines with curriculum visualization. Also, I think learning analytics and how to analyze learning in general were very interesting for me.

“Themes and Skills” that COGS students felt were integral to their degree.

Q: What are some specific projects you are currently working on?

A: Currently I’m working on developing an internal onboarding system that includes being able to explain our product to a broader audience that fits into specific categories, and a system to be able to quickly learn the product and start using it. For example, for an instructor to create course content on our platform, or for students to be involved in a co-creation process with instructors, as well as for people who want to use the tool to discover themselves, which I think is very important for me and is why I want to focus on the current project I’m working on.

On the other side, I’m interested in being able to run more UX studies, which will be interesting to have the UX aspect of work experience and knowing how to really run a study, how to design it, how to analyze the data…the whole process of it. Another part of it is I’m probably going to be trying to work on one of the two papers we plan to publish, but I’m still deciding which one, to understand how Tapestry gets to the point it has, what contribution Tapestry has put out there in the academic or corporate world. It will very interesting to see and track that process.

Q: Alright, this is a different direction, but more and more we see that instructors are seeking creative ways to improve their course content creation and implementing a blended classroom model. In what ways do you see Tapestry could improve their course building experience?

A: I think for instructors, it will be interesting to see how they convert traditional PowerPoint presentations into a non-linear form of presentations of course content, and perhaps they will be able to access a new interpretation of their own content as well. I think that part is very interesting. Also, for the students, if they can actually be involved in creating and evolving the course content, I think that would be interesting to see going forward as well.

Q: What aspect of Tapestry are you most eager to see implemented in a classroom or workplace?

A: I think it’s the idea of co-creation. It’s something I’m very interested in seeing how it would evolve. I think the current education system focuses too much on passing down knowledge, but knowledge should not be passed down but rather be an interactive process and essentially a creative process. It’s when students get their information, they try their ways of understanding it, and they give back the instructors something that the instructors might not expect. I think that’s why instructors like teaching. So I think it will be interesting to see how this co-creation process is enabled through using the Tapestry Tool.

Q: Thank you so much for answering our questions.

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